Speaking Dog 101 – Understanding Your Dog

Speaking Dog 101 – Understanding Your Dog

PART 2: Tales that Tails tell

Any dog parent can tell you with absolute certainty that if they had one wish, it would be to speak to and understand their dog. Love overcomes all barriers but language is a pretty big one. However, animal behaviourists have found that there are certain cues that can help us hoomans understand the basics of what our dogs are trying to communicate with us.

In our Speaking Dog 101 series, we explore the various complex and simple cues that you can pick up from our beloved fur babies. In part 2, we take a look at what you pupper’s tail movements mean.

If you missed it, check our part 1 here.

1.      Wagging tail

Usually, a dog wags his tail to show friendliness or happiness. If he wags rapidly while holding it down, he’s showing submissiveness. If he slowly wags the tail while keeping it in the natural position, you should know that he is alert or wants to play.

Usually, a dog wags his tail to show friendliness or happiness. If he wags rapidly while holding it down, he’s showing submissiveness. If he slowly wags the tail while keeping it in the natural position, you should know that he is alert or wants to play.

Your canine friend is confused, sad, or unwell if he slowly wags his tail while holding it down. If he slowly wags it while holding it high, he’s excited or confident.

2.      Holding tail straight

If your dog holds his tail straight up, he’s confident, aroused, or excited. Some dogs show this behaviour when they meet other canines or other animals. If the upright tail is slightly shaking, you should know that he’s facing a challenge.

A dog is content, happy, or relaxed, if his tail is level with the body. Moreover, if your canine buddy is holding his tail low with no movement, he’s showing alertness or insecurity.

3.      Tucking tail between legs

Your canine friend is afraid, nervous, worried, or under stress, if he holds his tail between the legs. If he holds the tail tightly against the belly, you should know that he’s extremely scared or submissive. According to our  own findings, dogs show this behaviour when meeting other dominant animals. They also show this body language when punishing them.

The important thing is to trust your gut when it comes to being an animal owner. You know your dog’s behaviour and you know your pet. If you are unsure or worried, take your dog to get checked up by a vet or animal professional.

Sources

https://pethelpful.com/dogs/common-dog-behaviors-you-should-know-their-meaning
https://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/behavior-appearance/types-of-common-dog-behavior
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